Emergency Management News

Wednesday, August 16, 2017

Are you #OKready for #OKheat?

Keep Your Cool in Hot Weather

#BeatTheHeat This Summer
As summer heats up, learn how to prepare for high temperatures.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), sickness from the heat occurs when your body cannot compensate and properly cool you off. However, heat-related illness and death are preventable.

Before the next heat wave, outdoor activity, or Fourth of July celebration, follow these protective actions from the CDC and stay cool this summer:
  • Stay in an air-conditioned location as much as possible.
  • Drink plenty of fluids even if you do not feel thirsty.
  • Take several breaks from the heat, especially midday when the sun is hottest.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing, and sunscreen. Remember that you should reapply sunscreen every three to four hours.
  • Take cool showers or baths to cool down.
  • Check on friends or neighbors during extremely hot days and have someone do the same for you.
  • Never leave children or pets in cars.
  • Check the local news for health and safety updates.

Find more information on extreme heat preparedness at www.ready.gov/heat.

Wednesday, August 9, 2017

Disaster Preparedness at Your Fingertips

FEMA App Graphic
Take the first step toward emergency preparedness by downloading the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) app.

Did you know your smartphone can be an important tool to help you prepare?

Many people use mobile applications (apps) to receive updates on severe weather, help them plan for emergencies, and stay informed of community activities.

The Disaster Information Management Research Center compiled apps from various organizations to help you find appropriate and trustworthy applications including those from FEMA and the American Red Cross. These apps cover the following areas:
  • Family Reunification
  • American Red Cross Suite of Apps
  • Chemical, Biological, Radiological, Nuclear and Hazardous Substances
  • Medical and Health Information
  • Responder Support and Safety including field operations guides
  • Psychological Health Tools for staying emotionally healthy
  • U.S. Federal Agencies
  • Surveillance and Alerts such as disease outbreaks and severe weather warnings

Having preparedness information and planning tools literally at your fingertips is an easy way to take action now!

Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Fire Safety for Older Adults #OKfire

Fire Safety Infographic
People over the age of 65 face the greatest risk of dying in a fire, according to the U.S. Fire Administration (USFA). 

Reduce that risk by protecting yourself and your loved-ones with these special precautions from the USFA:
  • Install and maintain smoke alarms on each level of your home and inside and outside sleeping areas. Test them monthly, and replace alkaline batteries at least once a year.
  • Develop a fire escape plan around your abilities. If you use a walker or wheelchair, check all exits to be sure that you can go through the doorways. Unless instructed by the fire department, never use an elevator during a fire.
  • When using medical oxygen, the amount of oxygen in the air can increase. This means there is a higher risk of both fires and burns because it is easier for a fire to start and spread. Never smoke in a home where someone is using medical oxygen. Also, never use a candle, match, lighter or other open flame. In addition, never use a fireplace, stove or other equipment fueled by gas, kerosene, wood or coal. Keep oil, grease and similar petroleum-based products away from oxygen valves. They can cause a spontaneous explosion.

Learn more about how older adults can stay safe from fire with more tips, resources and statistics from the USFA.